Beans

What are they?

Legumes such as lentils and chickpeas.

When and where are they used?

Often part of the staple food basket provided to a general population. Can also be provided to displaced populations who rely on food assistance to survive.

How are they used?

Transported in sacks and distributed as staple food items to be cooked. In developing countries, they’re often the most affordable and accessible source of protein.

WFP/Agron Dragaj

Key Nutrients

Beans are high in vitamins and minerals like fiber, iron, B vitamins and folate. Typically, beans contain about twice the amount of protein found in whole grain cereals like wheat, oats, and barley.

Oil and Salt

What are they?

Often part of the staple food basket provided to a general population. Can also be provided to displaced populations who rely on food assistance to survive.

How are they used?

They are fortified with vitamins and used for both cooking and taste.

WFP/Marco Frattini

Key Nutrients

Vitamins A and D (oil) and Iodine (salt).

Grains

What are they?

Edible grasses or seeds such as wheat, barley, oats, rice or corn.

When and where are they used?

Often part of the staple food basket provided to a general population. Can also be provided to displaced populations who rely on food assistance to survive.

How are they used?

Transported in sacks and distributed as staple food items to be cooked.

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WFP/Petterik Wiggers

Key Nutrients

Grains are high in vitamins and minerals like Vitamins A, B6, C and Iron.

Snack Bars

What are they?

Bars of baked wheat flour, vegetable fat, soya protein concentrate and malt extract.

When and when are they used?

In emergencies when local food can’t be distributed or prepared. Not for children under 6 months or in the first weeks of treatment of severe malnutrition.

How are they used?

Eaten straight from the package or mixed with water to make a porridge. Drinking water must be provided as the bars are compact and dry.

Learn more about this product:

WFP Starts Local Production Of Date Bars In Syria

WFP/Dina El-Kassaby

Key Nutrients

Vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, B12, C, D3, Folic acid, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Potassium and Sodium.

High-energy Biscuits

What are they?

Wheat-based biscuits that are fortified, pre-packaged and shelf-stable.

When and where are they used?

In the first days of an emergency when cooking facilities are scarce. Because they’re pre-packaged and compact, high-energy biscuits are easy to distribute and provide a quick solution to improve the level of nutrition without water or cooking.

WFP/Daniel Johnson

Key Nutrients

10 to 15 g protein and 450 kcal of energy. Vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, B12, C, D, E, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, Iodine, Folic Acid, Pantothenic Acid and Niacin.

Fortified Blends

What are they?

Blends of partially precooked and milled cereals, soya and beans fortified with micronutrients. Special formulas may contain vegetable oil or milk powder.

When and where are they used?

To provide protein supplements; as part of WFP’s school meals program; as part of programs to prevent and address nutritional deficiencies among mothers and children; and to provide extra micronutrients to complement the general ration.

How are they used?

Usually mixed with water and cooked as a porridge.

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WFP/Giulio d’Adamo

Key Nutrients

Vitamins A, B6, B12, C, Folic acid, Zinc, Iron, Calcium and Potassium.

Micronutrient Powders

What are they?

A tasteless powder containing the recommended daily intake of 16 vitamins and minerals.

When and where are they used?

Useful as an alternative to fortified blends or when those blends are inadequate for specific groups.

How are they used?

One sachet per person is sprinkled onto home-prepared food after cooking and just before eating. Can also be used in school meal programs.

WFP/Mike Bloem

Key Nutrients

Vitamins A, B12, C, D, E, K, Pyridoxine, Folic Acid, Niacin, Zinc, Iron, Selenium and Iodine.

Ready-to-use Foods

What are they?

Specially designed products for moderately malnourished children. May contain vegetable fat, dry skimmed milk, sugar and whey.

When and where are they used?

In emergencies or in the prevention or treatment of moderate malnutrition. Complements breast milk and other food for children aged 6 to 59 months.

How are they used?

Weekly rations or one-day sachets (Plumpy’Dozor Plumpy Sup, by Nutriset) can be eaten directly from their containers. Designed to be eaten as a supplement to the regular diet.

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WFP/Agron Dragaj

Key Nutrients

Vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, B12, C, Calcium, Magnesium, Zinc, Iron, Potassium and Folic acid.

Homegrown School Meals

What are they?

School meals provided by WFP that are sourced using locally grown crops like corn, sweet potatoes, papayas and okra.

When and where are they used?

In regions of sufficient agricultural production where smallholder farmers can meet the demand with technical assistance and support from WFP.

How are they used?

To supplement or replace fortified blends to nourish students in classrooms. This approach helps children grow healthy and strong, encourages school attendance and provides a reliable market for locally grown crops.

Learn more about this product:

WFP/Daniel Johnson

E-cards

What are they?

These are paper or electronic cards that can be redeemed in local markets for fresh food, including meats, produce and dairy.

When and where are they used?

When local markets are functioning and food is available for purchase.

How are they used?

These are used to expand dietary diversity, boost local economies and support local food producers. Electronic cards also save time and money on shipping and storage.

WFP/Ellie Kealey